Sunday, November 19, 2006

More Play

Wet on Dry

Pears Wet on Wet

Wet on Dry

Onion Wet on Wet

I sketched both of these before and thought I'd try them again with the aim to 'loosen' the results.

I've included both images -- the first was done wet on dry; the second, wet in wet and with a large brush. I can see a bit more looseness, but not quite as much as I had hoped.

In the flowers posted below, I used a watercolor pencil on wet paper to outline the flowers. That very wetness caused a 'bleed' that I liked. In the onion and the pears (wet on wet), I used watercolor over pencil since I didn't want to actually 'outline' the object, but I do miss that blurring.

I also noticed that there is a 'crispness' about wet on dry that I also like and that is definitely blurred when using more wet on wet. I also want to be careful that being 'loose' does not result in being sloppy ... but I'm not quite sure where THAT line is ...

More practice ....

12 comments:

Lorraine said...

Oh Wow, I don't think you have to worry about being sloppy. Those pears are ready to eat and the onion to is incredible. I think I like the wet on dry best but perhaps that's what I'm used to with your paintings.
I think there's room for both -- depends on what you are trying to achieve -- reality or suggestion. Oh my goodness -- I can't get over those pears!!! Incredible.
Hugs,
Lorraine

Katherine said...

Really good to see you doing these experiments - it's a lot of fun isn't it!

Ujwala said...

lin these are gorgeous. i would love to be able to paint like that.

Anonymous said...

They're ALL very good -- just depends on which "look" you are going for. It's very interesting to see the same subjects done differently - an excellent exercise to keep on hand!! Your pigments on all of these are TO DIE FOR!! So realistic - you are doing SUPERBLY, my friend!!

Jana Bouc said...

Your control of the medium is really terrific. Both techniques are great--I usually use them in combination in any given painting. Often my first layer of an object or group of objects is done wet in wet and then I add more layers on top of that, using combinations of wet in wet and wet on dry. I rarely do paintings of all one or the other, though I know others do. Those pears are just beautiful and it's great to see you experimenting outside the box...er sketchbook.

Renate said...

Both methods have their beauty. And you handle them very well!

Laura said...

You might want to try wet on wet with subjects that are more inherently colorful, or that have multiple shapes and form---that way the paint can really do its thing. It's hard to get zingy with one enclosed shape painted in neutral colors, know what I mean, cara? But, here again, you've done a superb job of rendering the rounded mass and highlight of fruit and vegetable!

Anonymous said...

:-D If you find that line (between loose and sloppy) please let me know! Have you tried doing a mix of wet on dry and wet on wet -- so that you lose a few lines and not others?

WONDERFUL pears!

Terri said...

My personal visual preference is wet on dry, but then I'm not known for my *loose* artisic renditions. In fact lately, I'm not known for ANY artistic renditions! LOL. But I have to say, I do really like your wet on wet onion. Very nice. :o)

Tami said...

Holy Cow, Lin! That wet on dry onion just POPS pff the page.

Anonymous said...

Yes, the wet on dry is just stunning!

Julie Oakley said...

You've done a fantastic job of all of these. The pears have a beautiful almost metallic sheen. Congratulations on your year anniversary. I hope you don't mind me saying but you are living proof that practice, practice, practice is what makes all the difference. I always think of you when people say 'I'd love to do that but I'm not artistic' Sorry that sounds terribly rude - what I mean is that with daily practice your progress has been phenomenal and it's nonsense to think that people are born with talent. Talent comes with hard work.